In a call to fix the straying ways of their alma maters, a group of older Christian Church preachers from around the country have posted a protest document to the chapel doors of their respective schools.

Bill Reed, graduate of Atlantic Christian College (now Point University), explained, “We came up with these 95 theses so we can reform the Bible College Movement.  The schools have left the straight and narrow road.”

This sampling of theses provides a sense of the group’s perspective.

  • Accreditation causes our schools to become liberal. In our day, we didn’t need accreditation.  We received apostolic succession through Alexander Campbell and J. W. McGarvey.
  • The beards have gotten completely out of hand. Back when we were in college the only person on campus who had a beard was Molly Fullerton, but I heard she wound up being a fine church secretary.
  • Professors are requiring liberal textbooks published by Baker and Zondervan. In our day, we only used books from College Press or Standard.
  • Liberalism is caused by a comfortable environment. When we were in school, we kept the faith once delivered to the saints because of our lack of air conditioning and heat, drinking cheap Folgers coffee, and eating gruel in the cafeteria.
  • Colleges are teaching way too much math and science. Back then we didn’t need math to graduate. Heck, we didn’t even know how to balance our checkbooks.  We just trusted in the Lord for such trivial things.  Our only science book was Genesis 1-3.

When asked if the document could be improved, a graduate of Cincinnati Bible Seminary (now Cincinnati Christian University) said, “No.  We really worked hard on this during the editing process.  For example, we were going to point out that back then we actually prayed in the prayer room instead of doing other things, but we realized it wasn’t true.”

The response from the schools has been muted due to the message being transmitted in a format that cannot be read on electronic devices.

By Dustin Fulton and The Bald Prophet


 

Photo Credit:  [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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